A little town where wireless really means less

Ever hear of a small town called Green Bank, West Virginia? Until tonight, I hadn’t either. It’s a relatively small community of around 140 people as of the 2010 census and is about four hours from Washington, D.C. 

What makes this town interesting is that it’s localed in the middle of the National Radio Quiet Zone, a 13,000 square mile exclusion zone where all forms of wireless radios and transmitters are illegal to use. This includes wifi, Bluetooth, cellphones, AM/FM and pretty much anything that transmits (with very few exceptions). 

The reason? Because it’s home to the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, the worlds largest steerable radio telescope. The ground stations are described as “so sensitive that it can pick up the energy equivalent to a single snowflake hitting the ground“. That’s pretty amazing if you ask me. 

The radio morrotorium has also attracted new residents, those who suffer from a condition called electromagnetic hypersensitivity, which is basically folks who are sensitive to electromagnetic fields. 

The Washingtonian wrote a great story about the history of the area, the people and dynamics in that region if you’re interested in reading more. Time well spent. 

Print isn’t dead yet

If the book is dead, nobody bothered to tell the folks at Capitol Hill Books in Washington, D.C. Books of every size, shape and genre occupy each square inch of the converted row house — including the bathroom — all arranged in an order discernible only to the mind of Jim Toole, the store’s endearingly grouchy owner.

He has banned several words from his store, including “awesome,” “perfect” and “Amazon.”

Nice writeup by NPR about a brick and mortar bookstore surviving in the digital age, where you can read on virtually any device, anytime, anywhere.

While I am a digital convert and take my Kindle just about everywhere, much of this article resonates with me, the feel of pages turning, the smell when you crack open a fresh copy or rereading an old classic. There really is something special about holding a real book in your hand.

Caught

A fisherman caught this guy on the Buckroe Pier. Earlier today he was in a tub waiting for the wildlife service folks to respond, sedate and remove the hook from his mouth. He (I assume it’s a he) doesn’t seem to particularly enjoy captivity…hopefully by now has been released into the water of VA Beach. Big fella, probably twice the length of my foot.

  

Censorship around the globe

The Committee to Protect Journalists put together an in-depth article about the top ten most censored Countries around the world. It’s a really fascinating read, highlighting the punishments for not towing party lines, number of jailed journalists and some of the techniques used to control what’s read and put out into the ether. I thought going into this that it would be pretty easy to guess who number one would be, surprisingly I was wrong (but it was close).

Living in a country where speech is protected and reporters are everywhere, it’s easy to forget or overlook that it can be much more difficult to report on the truth elsewhere. Makes me even more proud to work for a company that’s all about democratizing publishing.

Here’s a link to the article:
https://cpj.org/2015/04/10-most-censored-countries.php